Tag Archives: #BlackLivesMatter

MLK: Beyond Vietnam, A Time to Break Silence

“Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence”
To King, the Vietnam War was only the most pressing symptom of American colonialism worldwide.

BAR Book Forum: Keisha Blain’s “Set the World on Fire,” by Roberto Sirvent

“It is impossible to understand, or even fully appreciate, how black women have shaped national and global politics today without knowing the larger history.” Roberto Sirvent, BAR Book Forum Editor  Black Agenda Report  May 23, 2018 Keisha Blain In this series, we ask acclaimed authors to answer five questions about their book. Today’s featured author […]

FBI Greenlights Crackdown On Black Lives Matter Protesters

The pattern is clear: Federal and local law enforcement target the First Amendment-protected activities of social justice movements because they pose a political threat, not a violent one.

Michael Eric Dyson | What White America Fails to See

You do not condemn these cops; to do so, you would have to condemn the culture that produced them — the same culture that produced you. Black people will continue to die at the hands of cops as long as we deny that whiteness can be more important in explaining those cops’ behavior than the dangerous circumstances they face.

Kevin Zeese, Margaret Flowers: End the Security State

As we have written before, infiltration is the norm, not the exception of political movements throughout US history. History shows how this growing security state is tied to the bi-partisans in government protecting big business interests and the unfair economy.

VIDEOS: Supporters for Jamar, Black Lives Matter, March and Candlelight Vigil

Morales: If you were to walk among the crowds that gather each night outside the fourth police precinct in the late autumn darkness you would know that it’s all about hope. Hope is what drives a people to resist.

Jamar Clark’s Killer Cops Identified Amid Growing Protests in Minneapolis

Levy-Pounds: Now, according to witnesses, they grabbed Jamar, one by each arm. The witnesses say that they placed him in handcuffs, and that one officer grabbed Jamar’s head in a chokehold and brought him to the ground. They said the other officer then put his knee in Jamar’s chest while he was on the ground. Meanwhile, the other officer stood over Jamar’s body, and shot him once in the head at point-blank range.

Communities United Against Police Brutality

FAIR: To LA Times, Meth in Skid Row Victim’s Blood More Important Than Gun in His Flesh

From the article: Captured on cellphone video, the incident received attention because we are living in a moment when many people have decided that the state-sanctioned killing of black people by law enforcement is worth our attention—and that’s very uncomfortable for those who want to believe that every police killing must be in some way justified, if we could only see how.

The Intercept: Feds Regularly Monitored Black Lives Matter Since Ferguson

Joseph: “What they [the DHS] call situational awareness is Orwellian speak for watching and intimidation,” said Azmy. “Over time there’s a serious harm to the associational rights of the protesters and it’s an effective way to chill protest movements.

http://www.october22.org/

Matt Taibbi: Sandra Bland Was Murdered

Taibbi: After Ferguson, it was the same thing. Editorials insisted that the solution to the brutality problem lay in “less criminality within the black community.” The officer who shot Michael Brown, Darren Wilson – the same guy who called Brown a “demon” – insisted that Brown would still be alive “if he’d just followed orders.”

Ajamu Baraka: The Assassination of Sandra Bland and the Struggle against State Repression

From article: “Authentic justice and liberation will only come when there is authentic de-colonization and revolutionary power in the hands of self-determinate peoples’ and oppressed classes and social groups.”

Henry A. Giroux | The Racist Killing Fields in the US: The Death of Sandra Bland

Giroux: We celebrate violence in the name of security and violate every precept of human justice through an appeal to fear. This speaks clearly to a form of political repression and a toxic value system.

Salon| “We are in a revolutionary moment”: Chris Hedges explains why an uprising is coming — and soon

Hedges: If things unravel [in the U.S.], our backlash may very well be a rightwing backlash — a very frightening rightwing backlash. We who care about populist movements [on the left] are very weak, because in the name of anti-communism these movements have been destroyed; we are almost trying to rebuild them from scratch. We don’t even have the language to describe the class warfare that is being unleashed upon us by this tiny, rapacious, oligarchic elite. But we on the left are very disorganized, unfocused, and without resources.

Evergreene Digest: 1968 and the Invention of the American Police State

Baltimore’s 1968 Holy Week Uprising was quite different from the events of this week. But the response to it helped set the stage for Freddie Gray. Juan González on Walter Scott Shooting: When Will the Police Killings of Black Males Stop? Daniel Denvir, City Lab / The Marshall Project Apr 30, 2015 | Many have […]

Chris Hedges: Rise of the New Black Radicals

Hedges: There is a word for what is bubbling up from below—revolution. It can’t begin soon enough.

10 Images of the Baltimore Riots You Won’t See on TV and More Baltimore from The Real News Network

From the article: You’d never know it from the media’s Gotham-esque portrayal of a city riddled with criminals and “thugs,” but on Monday night Baltimore was also a story of good Samaritans trying to disperse emotional crowds. It was a story of everyday citizens determined to dissipate tensions between protesters and police, of ordinary folks cleaning up their city while the media turned its cameras away. And it was a story of determined advocates for racial equality holding a meaningful dialogue with police on the streets.

Sonali Kolhatkar: Black Lives Matter … and Black Jobs Matter, Too

Kolhatkar: As a recent Time magazine cover story illustrates, the Black Lives Matter movement has successfully shaped the mainstream narrative of the reality of police violence against African-Americans. But most of the discussion of the fixes that are needed have focused primarily on police accountability such as civilian oversight and requiring officers to wear body cameras. Few analysts have made the crucial link between police brutality and economic injustice. Now, grassroots activists are not only pointing out that black lives matter, but by extension, black jobs matter, too.

The New Civil Rights Movement Doesn’t Need An MLK

From the article: a landscape of new, youth-led organizations now populates the political domain. Their tactic of choice is participatory politics, which they pursue through the disintermediating power of digital media for grass-roots organizing. Using an array of tools — from protests to memes to agitprop — they seek to change the public agenda, mobilize the marginalized and advocate policy reforms. A network of loosely affiliated organizations, whose links are growing tighter, has been pursuing racial justice for nearly a decade now, right under the noses of the mainstream media.

Jim Walsh, MinnPost: Meet the Mall of America 11

Walsh: …at the moment the MOA 11 stand together as a brave if somewhat reluctant figurehead, a group of thought leaders who see themselves as torch bearers of their lunch-counter-sitting and back-of-the-bus–sitting forefathers and mothers before them, taking on America’s history of institutional racism itself.

Channing Joseph: A ‘Black Lives Matter’ Activist Faces Hard Time Under a Law Meant for Racist Killers

Joseph: Her prosecution gives us an opportunity to ponder the true meaning of “lynching,” and to remember and to grapple with this shameful and bloody aspect of our nation’s history. We may willfully forget the past, but doing so will never make the consequences of the past disappear.