Tag Archives: Vietnam War

DN! “Humane”: Yale Historian Samuel Moyn on “How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War”

“…when Biden gave his two speeches the other week defending the pullout from Afghanistan, he made utterly clear that while giving up on failed counterinsurgency, he is turning to, and maybe will intensify himself, the real fruit of 9/11, which is kind of endless counterterror, no matter what the constraints of international law say, unless they require the drones to strike or the special forces to visit with care for the victims.”

NY Times Op-Ed Denounces Daniel Ellsberg and Edward Snowden on 50th Anniversary of its Publishing the Pentagon, by Barbara Koeppel

In one piece, former New York Times foreign correspondent Elizabeth Becker says that, when the Pentagon Papers were exposed, “the nation was stunned. Responses ranged from horror to anger to disbelief.”

Celebrating Fifty Years of an Individual’s Courage in an Era of Apathy, by Danny Sjursen

“Still, there stands Daniel Ellsberg – and others like him; living and breathing correctives to any temptation towards apathy.”

Remembering Father Daniel Berrigan, a Prophet of Peace

Advice to parents, teachers, priests, ministers, et al: The young people will be different if you are different. They are moved by example, as I have been.

Martin Luther King: Breaking the Silence, Riverside Speech

MLK’s unheeded prophecy that has come true:
“The war in Vietnam is but a symptom of a far deeper malady within the American spirit, and if we ignore this sobering reality…and if we ignore this sobering reality, we will find ourselves organizing “clergy and laymen concerned” committees for the next generation. They will be concerned about Guatemala — Guatemala and Peru. They will be concerned about Thailand and Cambodia. They will be concerned about Mozambique and South Africa. We will be marching for these and a dozen other names and attending rallies without end, unless there is a significant and profound change in American life and policy.”

Memory Loss in the Garden of Violence: How Americans Remember (and Forget) Their Wars

“The payload of bombs unloaded on Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos between the mid-1960s and 1973 is commonly reckoned to have been between seven and eight million tons — well over 40 times the tonnage dropped on the Japanese home islands in World War II. Estimates of total deaths vary, but are all exceedingly high.”

“The Minnesota Conspiracy to Save Lives” by Chuck Turchick

“Move and you’re dead!” What? Who was this fellow? By Chuck Turchick  July 14, 2020 “Move and you’re dead!” What? Who was this fellow? With a cut-off sweatshirt, jeans, loafers without socks, I noticed he also had a gun pointed at me. Following him were a phalanx of about a dozen others. Who were they? […]

Danny Sjursen: Undercover Patriots Trump, Tulsa, and the Rise of Military Dissent

“Then there was the powerful visual statement of Marine Corps veteran Todd Winn, twice wounded in Iraq, who stood for hours outside the Utah state capitol in the sweltering heat in full dress uniform with the message ‘I Can’t Breathe’ taped over his mouth.”

Honoring the Warrior: Jim Northrup 1943 – 2016, by Craig Wood

“Despite his political edginess, PTSD and success as a writer, Northrup remained a warm, folksy man who continued to tell his stories in a straightforward and humorous way until his death. In 2016,”

Andrew J. Bacevich, The All-American Way: MLK’s Giant Triplets

“What I am suggesting is that those calling for fundamental change will go badly astray if they ignore Dr. King’s insistence that each of the giant triplets [racism, extreme materialism, militarism] is intimately tied to the other two.”

Ralph Nader: “Democratic Socialism” – Bring it on Corporate Socialists!

What is democratic socialism, anyway? Ralph Nader explains.

The Generals’ Long Con on Afghanistan, by Maj. Danny Sjursen

“I, for one, doubt that I’ll ever again trust the assertions and promises of most generals. And I’m not in bad company.”

Democracy Dies Without Alternative Media, Robert Sheer interview of Peter Richardson

It really goes to the great secret of American greatness, which comes not from, ever, from the establishment. It never comes from the best and the brightest. Unless they betray their class; unless they betray their teaching.

Minnesota Antiwar Activists: Polly Mann, Minnesota 8, and Catonsville 9

Like many of you, I suspect, I live a divided life—as described by the Italian communist Antonio Gramsci—with the pessimism of the intellect and the optimism of the will.  —Polly Mann The VIetnam War Era Oral History Project is a project of the Minnesota Historical Society that has documented the experiences of Minnesotans during the […]

What Activists Today Can Learn From MLK’s Bold Anti-War Stance, by Naomi LaChance

“The speech he delivered in New York, on April 4, 1967, was a speech for all humanity—for the world community. “

Break the Silence on Palestine, by Michelle Alexander

I cannot say for certain that King would applaud Birmingham for its zealous defense of Angela Davis’s solidarity with Palestinian people. But I do.

Veterans’ Group Says “No” to Emmy for PBS Vietnam War Series

Nowhere in 18 hours of programming does the G.I. resistance movement merit mention and “instead of honoring the civilian peace movement for its accomplishments, activists are generally belittled as self-interested and self-indulgent, with stress on its supposed deep antagonism toward American soldiers,” the ad protests.

Recipe for Perpetual War by Coleen Rowley and Robert Wing

Our out of control national destructiveness and its unspeakable costs constitute the “spiritual death” that Martin Luther King warned us about at the height of the Vietnam War, yet they remain mostly unaddressed in public discourse.

May 1968: Fifty Years Since the Catonsville Nine Action

Readers may ponder the sanity of a society that imprisoned those who substantively opposed a war of aggression by a superpower against a relatively small agrarian nation.

Recipe Concocted for Perpetual War is a Bitter One

Perpetual war is leading to a host of societal ills, yet debates on war and peace are almost entirely absent from public discourse, Robert Wing and Coleen Rowley observe.