Americans Who Tell the Truth: W.E.B. DuBois

W.E.B. DuBOIS Writer, Teacher, Civil Rights Spokesman: 1868 – 1963 “Back of the problem of race and color lies a greater problem and that is the fact that so many civilized person’s are willing to live in comfort even if the price of this is poverty, ignorance, and disease of the majority of their fellowmen, [and] that to maintain this privilege men have waged war until today war tends to become universal and continuous.

Biography

W.E.B. DuBois recognized that poverty and race were the major problems of the twentieth century.

He said: “To be a poor man is hard, but to be a poor race in a land of dollars is the very bottom of hardships.” And he helped describe for whites and blacks how divided an African-American can feel in the United States: “One ever feels his twoness —an American, a Negro, two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings, two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.”

Born in western Massachusetts, W.E.B. DuBois was educated at Fisk, Harvard and the University of Berlin. A list of his writings covers forty-five pages, but it is The Souls of Black Folk (1903), a collection of essays, sketches and musical paragraphs, that established him as one of the preeminent voices (along with Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Martin Luther King, Jr.) in the twentieth-century movement for racial justice and equality. For more than sixty years he brought intelligence, scholarly integrity and moral purpose to an unequaled striving for racial understanding and equality for all races.


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Robert Shetterly (born in 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American artist. Shetterly is best known for his portrait series, “Americans Who Tell the Truth,”  a project begun in response to U.S. government actions following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Towers in New York City. Shetterly undertook the project as a way to deal with his own grief and anger by painting Americans who inspired him. He initially intended to paint only 50 portraits, but by 2013 more than 180 portraits were included in the series. Portions of the series tour widely across the United States, being shown in schools, museums, libraries, galleries and other public spaces.

 [Source: Wikipedia]

AmericansWhoTelltheTruth.org for more information on tours and to purchase posters or cards.

For more biographical information and awards:  TheArtist

 

One comment

  1. billlincoln2 · · Reply

    Press release: ‘De facto’ discrimination, or de facto slavery? Employers are allowed to mistreat Blacks in S.C…US Court.

    US District Court, Charleston, SC; Employers, mistreating Blacks with undeserved difficulty in the workplace, are not guilty of discrimination. Imagine the public outcry if a dog was mistreated?

    The case now goes to the Supreme Court with this question.
    1. QUESTION PRESENTED filed to the Supreme Court Justices on 4-21-2014.
    “ Is it in the public interest to know that a US District Court, after reviewing evidence, ruled that a ‘group of executive White people were actually mistreating a Black employee and causing him undeserved difficulty at work’, but still did not find them guilty of racial discrimination or creating a hostile working environment ”?
    Background:
    1. William Lincoln filed a racial discrimination lawsuit in 2012 at the US District Court in Charleston, SC (Civil Action No. 2:11-3234-DCN-BHH).
    2. An abundance of evidence was given to the Court to substantiate the claim of racial discrimination, including the replacement of 90 per cent of the Black instructors with White instructors, in less than a year. He was the only Black instructor left.
    3. This is the mentality and actual ruling of the US District Court of the 4th District;
    In ‘REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION OF MAGISTRATE JUDGE’ under DISCUSSION,
    “The Court would acknowledge that the plaintiff may have legitimately faced some mistreatment or undeserved difficulty at work”. Some of the facts are irregular. But, there is no evidence that his experience was racially motivated.” (p4. para 1 and 2).
    4. The Appellate Court in Virginia upheld this ruling.
    5. So it is not your imagination that our Courts are mistreating Blacks and are extremely difficult for Black people.
    6. And it is no wonder that our prison system is overflowing with young Black men and women. And White men get away with cold blooded murder of young Black men.

    Like

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