The Art of the Shakedown, from the Nile to the Potomac> How Corruption in the U.S. Puts Everyday Corruption in Africa to Shame

By Lawrence Weschler  Nov. 1, 2011   TomDispatch

A bit over an hour into the five-hour drive across the ferrous red plateau, heading south toward Uganda’s capital Kampala, suddenly, there’s the Nile, a boiling, roiling cataract at this time of year, rain-swollen and ropy and rabid below the bridge that vaults over it. If Niagara Falls surged horizontally and a rickety bridge arced, shudderingly, over the torrent below, it might feel like the Nile at Karuma.

Naturally, I take out my iPhone and begin snapping pics.

On the other side of the bridge, three soldiers standing in wait in the middle of the road, rifles slung over their shoulders, direct my Kampalan driver Godfrey and me to pull over.

“You were photographing the bridge,” one of them announces, coming up to my open window. “We saw you.”

Click here to read more of this dispatch.

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By Published On: November 1st, 2011Comments Off on The Art of the Shakedown, from the Nile to the Potomac How Corruption in the U.S. Puts Everyday Corruption in Africa to Shame

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