Jason Ditz | Congress Wants Another $1 Trillion To ‘Reboot’ The Military

Despite record budgets over the past 15 years, Congress argues years of war have rendered US military hardware insufficient.

By

F35 Debate

An F-35 fighter taxis at Edwards Air Force base (AP/Lockheed Martin)

Panel members insist that 15 years of non-stop war has, despite that same period being loaded with record budgets, pushed the military to its limit, and that the new plan is needed, which will take a decade and cost an addition $1 trillion, above and beyond the already massive amounts being spent.

Hawks on the panel insist that the massive new scheme is needed because the military is “unready” to fight a major war with either Russia or China, despite the $1 trillion by itself likely to be well more than either nation spends in that time.

This trillion dollars easily breaks the budget on already prohibitively high military spending, and it’s just one of many schemes likely to be adopted. The “modernization” scheme for nuclear weapons is similarly expected to get into trillions of dollars, and will be running in parallel with this, and of course with all the ongoing wars and those liable to be launched since then, pushing the military’s actually budget closer to a trillion dollars on an annual basis.

© Antiwar.com


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