Edward Snowden makes ‘moral’ case for presidential pardon

Guardian Exclusive: Whistleblower says citizens have benefited from his disclosure in 2013 of US and UK government surveillance

Edward Snowden: ‘I’m willing to make a lot of sacrifices for my country’  (Video Interview)

Edward Snowden has set out the case for Barack Obama granting him a pardon before the US president leaves office in January, arguing that the disclosure of the scale of surveillance by US and British intelligence agencies was not only morally right but had left citizens better off.

The US whistleblower’s comments, made in an interview with the Guardian, came as supporters, including his US lawyer, stepped up a campaign for a presidential pardon. Snowden is wanted in the US, where he is accused of violating the Espionage Act and faces at least 30 years in jail.


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Speaking on Monday via a video link from Moscow, where he is in exile, Snowden said any evaluation of the consequences of his leak of tens of thousands of National Security Agency and GCHQ documents in 2013 would show clearly that people had benefited.

“Yes, there are laws on the books that say one thing, but that is perhaps why the pardon power exists – for the exceptions, for the things that may seem unlawful in letters on a page but when we look at them morally, when we look at them ethically, when we look at the results, it seems these were necessary things, these were vital things,” he said.

I think when people look at the calculations of benefit, it is clear that in the wake of 2013 the laws of our nation changed. The [US] Congress, the courts and the president all changed their policies as a result of these disclosures. At the same time there has never been any public evidence that any individual came to harm as a result.”

Demonstrators hold placards supporting Snowden during a 2013 protest against government surveillance in Washington, DC.

Demonstrators hold placards supporting Snowden during a 2013 protest against government surveillance in Washington DC. Photograph: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

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