The Intercept | Snowden Archive—the SIDtoday Files

 SIDtoday is the internal newsletter for the NSA’s most important division, the Signals Intelligence Directorate. After editorial review, The Intercept is releasing nine years’ worth of newsletters in batches, starting with 2003. The agency’s spies explain a surprising amount about what they were doing, how they were doing it, and why.

The Intercept  May 16, 2016

The SIDtoday Files is where The Intercept will be releasing articles from SIDtoday, an internal publication of the National Security Agency. The articles are written in accessible, non-technical language and offer a window into the NSA’s culture and operations. They originate from within the Signals Intelligence Directorate, or SID, the NSA’s core spying division, and were provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

We’ll be releasing these files in large batches, starting with articles from the period after SIDtoday’s inception in March 2003. The articles will be subjected to editorial evaluation, legal review, research, reporting, and redaction, described in this overview. They will be accompanied by related Intercept news articles when appropriate.

While we have focused on the parts of these documents we find most compelling, we anticipate readers will find other information of interest in the files we are sharing. If you see something interesting you’d like to share with us, please reach out as described below.

CONTACT US

Please contact Micah Lee or Margot Williams using their email addresses and, optionally, their PGP keys. To contact The Intercept anonymously, please follow these instructions.

Media for the people!  Bringing you the best of the alternative media and original articles and videos.  Click here to help by learning more about Rise Up Times, spreading the word, and making a donation. 

SIDtoday is the internal newsletter for the NSA’s most important division, the Signals Intelligence Directorate. After editorial review, The Intercept is releasing nine years’ worth of newsletters in batches, starting with 2003. The agency’s spies explain a surprising amount about what they were doing, how they were doing it, and why.

Last Update — May 16 2016

The Intercept’s first SIDtoday release comprises 166 articles, including all articles published between March 31, 2003, when SIDtoday began, and June 30, 2003, plus installments of all article series begun during this period through the end of the year. Major topics include the National Security Agency’s role in interrogations, the Iraq War, the war on terror, new leadership in the Signals Intelligence Directorate, and new, popular uses of the internet and of mobile computing devices.

Along with this batch, we are publishing the stories featured below, which explain how and why we’re releasing these documents, provide an overview of SIDtoday as a publication, report on one especially newsworthy set of revelations, and round up other interesting tidbits from the <em≥sidtoday< em=””>files.

📥DOWNLOAD THIS BATCH
🐱DOWNLOAD DOCUMENTS VIA GITHUB

CREDITS

The SIDtoday Files was produced by a core team at First Look Media Works, led by The Intercept’s Technology Analyst Micah Lee and Research Editor for Investigations Margot Williams.

Project contributors include Research Editor Alleen Brown, Associate EditorAndrea Jones, Design Director Stéphane Elbaz, Software Engineer Raby Yuson, Senior Software Engineer Joshua Thayer, and Product Technology Lead Tom Conroy.

Project oversight was provided by The Intercept’s Editor-in-Chief Betsy Reed, Research Director Lynn Dombek, Deputy Editor Ryan Tate, and General CounselLynn Oberlander.

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: