Evergreene Digest: Continuing MLK’s Work on the 46th Anniversary of His Assassination

  • The best way to honor his memory is to continue the struggle for human dignity, workers’ rights, living wages, and social justice.

  • Part 1: Why He Was In Memphis

  • Part 2: Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence ~ Rev. Martin Luther King 

Photo added by Rise Up Times

Part 1: Why He Was In Memphis

A half-century before Occupy Wall Street, King warned about the “gulf between the haves and the have-nots” and insisted that America needed a “better distribution of wealth.”

Peter Dreier, Huffington Post <http://www.huffingtonpost.com&gt;

04/04/2014 | Most Americans today know that Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was killed 46 years ago — on April 4, 1968 — in Memphis, Tennessee. But fewer know why he was there.

King went to Memphis to support African American garbage workers, who were on strike to protest unsafe conditions, abusive white supervisors, and low wages — and to gain recognition for their union. Their picket signs relayed a simple but profound message: “I Am A Man.”


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Peter Dreier, is E.P. Clapp Distinguished Professor of Politics, Occidental College.

Full story…

Part 2: Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence ~ Rev. Martin Luther King

Speech delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on April 4, 1967, at a meeting of Clergy and Laity Concerned at Riverside Church in New York City

I come to this magnificent house of worship tonight because my conscience leaves me no other choice. I join with you in this meeting because I am in deepest agreement with the aims and work of the organization which has brought us together: Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam. The recent statement of your executive committee are the sentiments of my own heart and I found myself in full accord when I read its opening lines: “A time comes when silence is betrayal.” That time has come for us in relation to Vietnam.

The truth of these words is beyond doubt but the mission to which they call us is a most difficult one. Even when pressed by the demands of inner truth, men do not easily assume the task of opposing their government’s policy, especially in time of war. Nor does the human spirit move without great difficulty against all the apathy of conformist thought within one’s own bosom and in the surrounding world. Moreover when the issues at hand seem as perplexed as they often do in the case of this dreadful conflict we are always on the verge of being mesmerized by uncertainty; but we must move on.

Hartford Web Publishing.  Hartford Web Publishing provides pro bono web publishing services that in general aim to promote social progress.

Complete text of speech…

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